Wallabies TrailNewsDecember 3, 2019

Many years ago, the Curraghs Wildlife Park, which opened in 1965 in the north of the Island, had a colony of Wallabies.

Many years ago, the Curraghs Wildlife Park, which opened in 1965 in the north of the Island, had a colony of Wallabies.

During the sixties or seventies, a group of wallabies decided to make their “great escape” from their enclosure in the wildlife park. The Isle of Man now has one of the largest free wallaby populations in the northern hemisphere.

Hospice Isle of Man, working in partnership with Wild in Art created an event called Wallabies Gone Wild.

Between May and September 2019, the Isle of Man was brought to life by beautifully designed and decorated wallaby sculptures. In total there were 26 large wallaby sculptures designed by both local and national artists and sponsored by local businesses, and 38 small walababy sculptures that were designed by local schools and community groups. These were dotted around the Isle of Man, with a map and online trail to use so the wallabies could be tracked.

It has been proven that Wild Art Trails have an impact on peoples’ health and wellbeing in the communities where trails have taken place. It encourages people to get out and about, and promotes spending time with family.

Oak Group IOM staff and their children decided to take part in the Wallabies Gone Wild Trial. Those who completed the trial were presented with a Wallaby pack for their efforts collecting Wallaby pictures over a month.

Wallabies gone Wild AUCTION

At the end of the Wallabies Gone Wild 14 week adventure, the Hospice Isle of Man then Auctioned off the Wallabies to help raise further funds.

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